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Care about Trees?

Posted by Breckenridge Associates Real Estate on Saturday, April 7th, 2018 at 7:48pm.

Summit County cares about health. Kids, dogs and frogs have groups working for their health, and Summit is lucky enough to have a Forest Health Task Force, too.  This non-profit is currently looking for summer volunteers to help with forest projects. If you are a Summit County homeowner, joining the task force or its partner organization, Friends of the Dillon Range District, is a great way to learn about living in the wildland / urban interface.  There's more on this subject for homeowners on our Wildfire Protection page.

chart of defensible space in case of wildfire

The Forest Health Task Force needs volunteers to do a variety of citizen science and education initiatives. Diverse backgrounds and all ability levels are welcome — from those who don't know an elm from an aspen to trained scientists — the key attributes needed in volunteers are commitment, and a love for the outdoors.

Invasive or noxious weed “busting” is one never-ending project. Volunteers help monitor areas for invasive species, and make way for new trees and our beautiful wildflowers by spotting and eliminating the harmful species.

There are chances to work in photo documentation of the forest, tree dating, counting and measuring tree, community education and outreach, even tree planting.

If you'd like to get involved to help preserve both the health of trees and maintaining the recreational experience in the forests of Summit County, reach out today to the Summit Forest Health Task Force. Volunteers are encouraged to sign up on the web. Visit Friends of the Dillon Ranger District or call 970-262-449. 

A view of the forest

The next FHTF meeting will be April 18th from 12 - 1:30 p.m. in Summit County Commons Mt Royal Room. Or read their March newsletter where volunteer opportunities are discussed.

The Forest Health Task Force is a collaborative body that promotes forest health through education, outreach, community involvement and exploring forest management issues including tree-insect epidemics, the future forest, forest ecology, economics, recreation, and right sizing the timber industry and is guided by a mission statement most anyone can get behind:

“A sustainable high country forest ecosystem providing ecological diversity, clean water, valuable habitat, abundant recreation opportunities, and quality of life while supporting a healthy economy and vibrant communities without depletion of natural character and beauty. “

See you this summer on the trails and in the woods, planting, monitoring, data collecting, weed busting and recreating.

 

 

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