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Breck Associates home Selling Resort Property

Selling property in a resort area is quite different from selling other properties. Many of the resort properties are second homes or vacation properties which may be infrequently occupied. Colorado's climate, with its 300 annual days of sunshine and the rigors of snow and ice of the alpine environment, can be tough on properties. Staying on top of maintenance and presentation can be crucial to bringing top dollar for your property in a timely manner.

Few people, if any, NEED a second home in the mountains. They seek to buy for reasons that are far more emotional than those associated with the purchase of a primary residence in the city. The dream of a family getaway in the mountains is a powerful one, but it is important that it feels "just right." Purchasing a second home can be an emotional decision. As the seller, you want to help a buyer "put themselves in the picture" to improve your property's sale-ability and shorten marketing time, currently averaging over six months.

We'd love to provide you with a complimentary Market Analysis of your property-including simple tips on how it could be improved and even coordinate you with our legions of handy-persons to help get things done-especially useful if you are also a long-distance owner. Please fill out the request form so that we can get back to you right away!

At the State Legislature - Bill To Permit Unit Owners To Deed Restrict Properties to Become Law


In the mountain towns where affordable housing is hard to find, the local municipalities are working hard to address housing needs for middle class workers such as teachers and firefighters. With shortages of land, one way mountain towns are working to address affordable housing is to “buy down” condos and townhouses. The towns purchase the properties at market rate, and subsequently deed-restrict the property and sell it to a local at a lower price. What appeared to be a good idea has local homeowners associations reeling. Now many HOAs are writing into their covenants language that does not allow units to be deed restricted to prevent buy downs. To combat that, Representative Christine Scanlan introduced HB-1220, a bill that would allow unit owners to deed restrict their property in ski resort towns. The bill would supersede HOA covenants beginning in August of 2009. The bill has passed both chambers and will be signed by the Governor shortly. The Summit Association of REALTORS®, the Vail Board of REALTORS® and the Colorado Association of REALTORS® opposed the legislation and made efforts to amend the legislation to restrict the type of deed-restrictions and the percentage of units allowed to be deed-restricted. The bill had support in the state legislature, as well as support from local housing authorities.
Contact your Broker/Partner to learn more about this issue and how it could affect your property.

At the State Legislature - Bill Regarding Advertising of Rental Property Sent to Governor


Representative Christine Scanlan has carried a bill that is on its way to the Governor that would require an owner of furnished rental property to provide the Assessor with a list of the property’s furnishings each year. The law also prohibits an agent from advertising furnished residential real property for rent on behalf of a property owner if the owner refuses to provide the agent with the required information. Scanlan introduced this bill on behalf of Vail Resorts because the company felt it was at a competitive disadvantage against homeowners who rent their properties and do not collect or remit lodging taxes. Local assessors have had difficulty finding the homeowners who rent their properties. The Colorado Association of REALTORS® opposed HB-1110 because it will make a REALTOR® responsible for filing the information.
Contact your Broker/Partner to learn more about this issue and how it could affect your property.